Poker Omnibus W50P

Home Up

"Final Table: A Winning Poker Approach from a WSOP Champion" Review

Overview
[Hide Overview]

TitleFinal Table: A Winning Poker Approach from a WSOP Champion
AuthorJonathan Duhamel1
Year2012 (originally published in French as Cartes sur Table in 2011)
Skill Levelany
ProsWell-considered thoughts from a highly skilled poker pro.
ConsFairly short book with mostly high-level advice; would have benefited from a coherent retelling of the 2010 WSOP Main Event.
Rating3.0

Table of Contents
[Hide Table of Contents]

PageTitleChapter
viiForeword by Guy Laliberte
ixIntroduction
1Passion1
9Self-Confidence2
17Knowing Your Numbers3
25Getting in the Zone4
33Controlling Your Emotions5
41Discipline6
51Perseverance7
59Psychology8
67Knowing Yourself9
75The Thirst for Victory10
81Nerves of Steel11
89Caution12
97Endurance13
105Creativity14
113Intuition15
121Taking Risks16
129Luck17
135Experience18
141Conclusion
145Acknowledgments

Review
[Hide Review]

Originally published in the same year, Jerry Yang's All In and Jonathan Duhamel's Final Table: A Winning Approach From a WSOP Champion come from Main Event winners just three years apart but are extremely different types of books from very different players.

Yang's book teaches very little poker strategy but is much more riveting and covers his Main Event run thoroughly. Duhamel's book teaches a lot of poker strategy, but only occasionally references his victory.

Duhamel teaches what you need to know, both at the table and away from it, to play high-level poker. Chapters such as "Getting in the Zone", "Discipline", and "Knowing Yourself" could really apply to any game or sport, while others such as "Knowing Your Numbers", "Creativity", and "Taking Risks" give more specific poker advice. He actually refers to his eighteen chapters as "qualities" that all top poker pros, like Allen Cunningham, Daniel Negreanu, Phil Hellmuth, and Phil Ivey, possess.

A handful of "According to Jonathan" insets appear throughout the book with pithy recommendations, but these are underwhelming in length and quantity (just six of them).

The most interesting story in the book is unfortunately relegated to a few paragraphs at the end. An ex-girlfriend set up Duhamel to be violently robbed of a large amount of cash and his priceless championship bracelet, which was later recovered badly damaged.

Errata
[Show Errata]